November 17, 2015

Executive Summary


1. Call to Order

Chair Moore, called the sixth meeting of the sixty-second session of the NC State Faculty Senate to order at 3 p.m.

2. Introductory Remarks

Chair Moore asked all visitors to introduce themselves.

3. Announcements

Chair Moore announced that November 18th is the deadline to complete the tobacco attestation during open enrollment for health benefits. Several senators voiced their dissatisfaction with the enrollment process. Chair Moore stated that this is an issue that the Resources and Environment Committee can review. Chair Moore noted that additional announcements can be found on page 2 of the agenda.

4. Approval of the Minutes, Meeting No. 5, November 3, 2015

Secretary Orcutt asked for approval of the minutes for regular meeting number 5 of the 62nd session of the NC State Faculty Senate. The minutes were approved.

5. Remarks from Provost Arden

Provost Arden commented on the attacks in Paris and events that took place on the Missouri campus last week. Provost Arden stated that the massacres that took place in Paris affected all of us in many ways. NC State has a significant component of French students on campus, some of them are the SKEMA business students. He encouraged faculty and others to reach out to them and lend support. Provost Arden stated that currently there is a significant sensitivity on a lot of campuses across the country. It is concerning and is worth all of us thinking a little bit about how we should respond. Provost Arden stated that he and the Chancellor are very committed to a diverse and equitable campus where everyone is safe and feels safe to express their views. He said that does not mean that we are perfect and it doesn’t mean that we are immune to many of these same issues, but it does mean that we as a campus community need to come together and be willing to have open, honest, and inclusive dialogs about any problems that we have and try to address them proactively.

6. Athletics and Academics

Dr. Roby Sawyers, Professor of Accounting and Faculty Athletics Representative (FAR) provided information that describes what the FAR does and what the Council on Athletics do on a weekly basis. Dr. Sawyers stated that the Council on Athletics deals with a lot of academic issues with athletics. He chairs the Council on Athletics and the majority of the Council are faculty. Those faculty serve as a whole on the Faculty Academic Committee of the Council and that committee is chaired by Joe Pollard, Professor of Natural Resources. That group looks into the details of student athlete’s records, degree, audit, transcripts, etc., at least three times a year to ensure that they are academically eligible to compete. Academic Support Program for Student Athletes Katie Graham, Assistant Dean and Director of Academic Support Program for Student Athletes stated that the mission of the Academic Support Program for Student Athletes is to help recruit, retain, and graduate our student athlete population here at NC State. The program consists of 16 full time staff members and the majority of them work directly with students. They are academic coordinators, so each team has at least one academic coordinator assigned to them, who serves as a resource for the student athletes as well as a liaison with the coaches. Comments from Debbie Yow, Athletics Director Dr. Yow stated that the upcoming legislation doesn’t go far enough, that it would be the student workers who would be most likely to be involved in some type of issue. Student trainers, student strengthening and conditioning coaches, undergraduates working day to day with a student athlete population and becoming friends, that is where this would most likely happen. Dr. Yow noted that Katie Graham has a terrific system with the tutors. As an example there can be no communication between a student athlete and a tutor outside of their tutoring session. She does a tremendous job of trying to insure that these things are followed and that we have protocol. Dr. Yow handed out a sheet entitled “How to Operationalize Your Philosophy and Values into a Culture of Integrity and Excellence” that she wrote a while back as a result of having conversations with coaches. She stated that she has monthly meetings with the coaches and there is always something on academics and always something to be shared on compliance.

7. Issues of Concern

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences Undergraduate Education Committee expressed concern over faculty time involved in entering course data in the new online Course Inventory Management (CIM) system. The Faculty Senate Executive Committee discussed this and concluded that the main aspects of the concern are already being discussed in committee. Chair Moore stated that the Executive Committee received some new information and will review this issue again at the meeting on Thursday.

8. Adjourn

The meeting adjourned at 4:22 p.m.

Meeting Minutes


Present: Chair Moore, Secretary Orcutt, Parliamentarian Lubischer, Past Chair Zonderman, Provost Arden; Senators Ange-van Heugten, Argyropoulos, Auerbach, Banks, Bernhard, Bykova, Byrnes, Cubbage, Fleisher, Gunter, Moore, Pearce, Perros, Sannes, Smith, Smith McKoy, Steer, Williams   Excused: Senators Bartlett, Bird, Bullock, Davidian, Fath, Kathariou, Sotillo   Absent: Senators Ash, Devetsikiotis, Hergeth, Huffmann, Laffitte, Porter, Scearce, Silverberg, Spontak   Guests: Roy Baroff,, Faculty Ombuds; Marc Hoit, Vice Chancellor, Information Technology; Eileen Goldgeier, General Counsel; P.J. Teal, Secretary of the University; Monica Banks, Assistant to the Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs; Katharine Stewart, Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs; Debbie Yow, Director of Athletics; Roby Sawyers, Professor Management/Faculty Athletics Representative; Katie Graham, Assistant Dean/Director, Athletic Program for Student Athletes; Louis Hunt, Vice Provost for Enrollment Management  

1. Call to Order

Chair Moore, called the sixth meeting of the sixty-second session of the NC State Faculty Senate to order at 3 p.m.  

 2. Introductory Remarks

Chair Moore asked all visitors to introduce themselves.  

 3. Announcements

Chair Moore announced that November 18th is the deadline to complete the tobacco attestation during the open enrollment for health benefits. Several senators voiced their dissatisfaction with the enrollment process.   Past Chair Zonderman noted that every state agency is in the same situation.   Chair Moore noted that additional announcements can be found at the bottom of page 2 of the agenda.  

 4. Approval of the Minutes, Meeting No. 5, November 3, 2015

Secretary Orcutt asked for a motion to approve the minutes for regular meeting number 5 of the 62nd session of the NC State Faculty Senate.   The minutes were approved.  

 5. Remarks from Provost Arden

Provost Arden commented on the attacks in Paris and events that took place on the Missouri campus last week.   Provost Arden stated that the massacres that occurred in Paris affected all of us in many ways. NC State has a significant component of French students on campus, the SKEMA business students. He encouraged faculty and others to reach out to them and lend support. He said they are considered NC State students and resources of counseling are being made available to them as well. One of the folks killed in Paris was a SKEMA student and was close friends to four of the SKEMA students that are currently on campus. She was due to be on NC State campus next spring.   Provost Arden commented on the events that happened on the Missouri campus last week. He stated that there is currently a significant sensitivity on a lot of campuses across the country. It is fair to say that there are some developing cultural tensions on many campuses. Clearly the folks of Missouri did not handle it optimally. It is concerning and is worth all of us thinking a little bit about how we should respond.   Provost Arden stated that he and the Chancellor are very committed to a diverse and equitable campus where everyone is safe and feels safe to express their views and feels welcome on this campus. He said that doesn’t mean that we are perfect and it doesn’t mean that we are immune to many of these same issues, but it does mean that we as a campus community need to come together and be willing to have open, honest, and inclusive dialogues about any problems that we have and try to address them proactively.   Provost Arden stated that one thing that concerns him the most in the way that this was handled on some campuses is the loss of ability to have a civil and constructive academic discourse. He thinks as academicians we owe it to ourselves to listen to others who have differing views and by all means express the fact that you may differ, but respect the fact that others should be free to express their views and engage in an open dialogue. He stated that he doesn’t think that NC State will be immune to problems, whether they be problems of race or otherwise on this campus, but he feels that NC State has come a long ways in how we have open dialogues about these issues and how we listen to one another and how we work together as a campus community.   Provost Arden stated that he would like the faculty to work with him and the Chancellor, with each other, and with students and staff. He encouraged them to attend some of the sessions that will be taking place, whether it be on race or equity issues. He asked that the faculty participate and that they listen to others and together they can try to develop solutions.   Provost Arden stated that unfortunately, he thinks some of the problems that are plaguing some campuses are that people are taking very rigid views in one area and disrespect other people’s views.   Provost Arden stated that it is important that together we are willing to have open conversations about this and approach things as he thinks academics should. This should be a welcoming inclusive environment where everyone is open to express their opinions and we listen respectfully to other people’s opinions.   Provost Arden stated that he and the Chancellor are going to try and up their game on this issue. He said they have been working very hard at it for some time, making sure that they are listening to various segments and factions of our community and it’s not exclusive to any one area. For example, with the massacres that occurred in Paris, he worries about the fallout for our Muslim students on campus. He feels that it’s equally important to be sensitive to their needs and make sure they are free from harassment and discrimination.   Provost Arden asked that everyone be sensitive to these issues over the coming weeks and months and to participate and encourage colleagues to participate in dialogues and discussions. He said they (Provost and Chancellor) are going to try to be as available as possible. He predicted that this form of unrest is going to propagate and possibly escalate across American campuses in the coming months to years.   Provost Arden stated that there have been many issues that campuses are not immune to wash over onto our campuses, and when you think about the trends that occurred, there are reasons that things change so rapidly and escalate so quickly. Look what social media is doing and how quickly things can blow up and get out of control. So, there are many different forces and elements at work here, but at the heart of it is that we are one campus, we are one community, so he thinks together as administrators, faculty, and students we need to come together and really have an honest, open, and respectful discussion about the issues at hand.   Questions and Comments   Do you have any plans to encourage the deans of schools to have all the faculty and staff trained on emergency procedures should they be faced with a situation on campus?   Provost Arden’s response was, ever since last Friday our security particularly for large public events is going to be escalated. There are going to be increased security measures at football and basketball games and major public events. We continue to have training and we are having a tabletop training next week for executive officers, but sometimes I’m concerned that that level of training and awareness is not reaching all the levels of the universities. I will encourage a discussion with David Rainer where I will invite the dean’s council and encourage the same kind of training at the college level. I think it’s important not to be paranoid, but it is important that people have a high level of awareness and sensitivity. How we act in these situation is extremely important.   Is there any way we can brainstorm in terms of creating a forum where we are addressing some of these issues?   Provost Arden stated that there is no one group that has domain over discussions and forums - if the Faculty Senate wanted to have a discussion about race relations or about equity or about affordability and accessibility. He said, they (Provost Arden and Chancellor Woodson) have frequent discussions with multiple groups. Just last week they attended a regularly scheduled joint meeting with the Chancellor’s African American Advisory Council and the Diversity Advisory group. The next day they met with the Chancellor’s Liaison, which is a student group. There are multiple groups across campus that do not feel maximally included. He said it is not severe, but he thinks it behooves us to have those discussions and dialogue and he also thinks that it’s incumbent upon you the faculty to make sure that students perceive that you are listening, that this is an inclusive campus, and that we are committed to working together to develop solutions.   Roy Baroff, Faculty Ombuds, commented that he has significant experience in working with groups and conflicts and since his office is independent and is not part of any specific group it would be appropriate to reach out to him.   Past Chair Zonderman suggested that this be a topic of the Spring General Faculty meeting. He stated that the Chancellor has sent several communications out to the campus that he thinks struck a really good tone.   Dr. Zonderman stated that he believes universities across the country are kind of walking a tightrope. He asked, “How do we both promote the ideas of openness and inquiry and inclusivity at the same time? “ We are sort of one of the guardians of the first amendment of free speech and free rights, but at the same time we also should be modeling the kind of speech that moves the nation forward.  

6. Athletics and Academics

Dr. Roby Sawyers, Professor of Accounting and Faculty Athletics Representative (FAR) provided information that describes what the FAR does and what the Council on Athletics do on a weekly basis.   He pointed out that in his role he serves as a liaison between faculty and academics. If there are concerns or issues as they relate to athletics, bring them to him. Along with others on campus part of his job is to help ensure institutional control and academic integrity of our programs.   Dr. Sawyers stated that the Council on Athletics deals with a lot of academic issues with athletics. He chairs the Council on Athletics and the majority of the Council are faculty. Those faculty serve as a whole on the Faculty Academic Committee of the Council and that committee is chaired by Joe Pollard,   Professor of Natural Resources. That group looks into the details of student athlete’s records, degree, audit, transcripts, etc., at least three times a year to ensure that they are academically eligible to compete. That means that they are eligible with respect to NCAA rules and also that they are eligible as continuing students according to NC State rules as well.   Dr. Sawyers noted that the committee does have the right to report directly to the Chancellor, Provost, and Faculty Senate with any concerns that they have outside of the mechanics of the Council on Athletics.   Question: Have they ever done that?   Sawyers responded that he doesn’t know of a situation in which they needed to.   Dr. Sawyers stated that they have a good robust process for analyzing the courses that are taken. The Vice Provost for Enrollment Management primarily reviews the courses that the student athletes take and the grades that they make in those courses compared to the general student body. There is a limit as to how many student athletes can be enrolled within a section of a course. He stated that he receives a report of grade changes for student athletes, and if there are unusual grade changes those issues are looked into as well.   Dr. Sawyers stated that they pay special attention to student athletes who are near NCAA eligibility thresholds, with respect to the grades that they receive. They also look at nontraditional courses as well.   Sawyers stated that every semester, members of the faculty academic committee review student athletes’ transcripts and degree audits as part of their continuing eligibility review.   Academic Support Program for Student Athletes   Katie Graham, Assistant Dean and Director of Academic Support Program for Student Athletes, stated that the mission of the Academic Support Program for Student Athletes is to help recruit, retain, and graduate our student athlete population here at NC State. They are located in the Case Academic Center and they are not a unit in athletics. They are a unit in the newly formed University College and they report to its Director and Dean, Dr. Mike Mullen.   The Academic Support Program for Student Athletes consists of 16 full time staff members and the majority of them work directly with students; they are academic coordinators, so each team has at least one academic coordinator assigned to them who serves as a resource for the student athletes as well as a liaison with the coaches.   Graham stated that they also have a comprehensive tutoring program. Approximately 80 part time tutors each semester and also a part of the program is their Reconnect Program, which is an effort that was started many years ago to work with former student athletes that didn’t finish when they were here at NC State the first time, to help them come back and earn their undergraduate degree.   Graham stated that the cumulative GPA of our student athletes in comparison to the general student body is reported to the Chancellor and Board of Trustees every year. The student athletes’ GPAs are lower than the student body, but both are really trending upward. In spring 2014 the highest GPA (2.92) for the student athletes was recorded.   Graham stated that we have student athlete representation in all 10 colleges that award undergraduate degrees. The data she presented represented all student athletes as of Spring 2015 and 23% of the student athlete population is in DASA, which includes students who are still exploring majors as well as those in Environmental Science.   Graham stated that student athletes at their junior year and higher standing, at the end of the Spring 2015 semester, there were 286 students in that population and those 286 students are in 51 of the 101 majors across campus. The top five majors for student athletes are:  
  1. Sports Management
  2. Business Administration
  3. Communication
  4. Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management
  5. Biological Sciences
  Questions   What fraction would be in those top five?   Graham responded that in Sports Management, of the juniors and higher it is approximately 17% down to Biological Sciences, at approximately 8%.   Dr. Sawyers stated that of the 100 majors across campus student athletes are in 80 to 90 of them.   When you showed the cumulative GPA, is that a factor more of a general trend of student athletes or are there some real outliers affecting that?   Graham responded yes, she thinks there are some outliers on both ends. We have a lot of student athletes that are really high performing in the classroom and there are some that are on the bottom end as well.   What is the lowest GPA?   Graham stated that to continue at NC State you have to have a 1.8 GPA and for the NCAA rules they actually mirror that pretty closely. So, after freshmen year student athletes have to maintain 1.8 and then it goes up to 1.9 and then to a 2.0 GPA. There is no one on any roster that is below 1.8 and so last year’s total there were 4 sophomores under a 2.0, so not a large section of the population is under a 2.0 GPA.   Graduation Rates   Federal Graduation Rate   Katie stated that first time full time freshmen who enter into the fall semester, which would be the group that is in the student body and then the student athlete rate is that same group , but only students that are on scholarship. We have trending upward slowly with kind of an outlier year in 2007, so that class was our highest federal graduation rate that we have ever had. Although this year we dropped to 66% it is actually our second highest for student athletes that we have had at NC State.   The Division I National average is 65%, so that is pretty much where student athlete peers across the country have hovered. It has increased a little bit over the last four years.   If you look at the NC State Student Athletes and take out the outlier in 2007, are those percentages really significant?   Katie responded no, it was 64% in 2005, 65% in 2006 and this year is 66%, so there is a very small increase. We want to close the gap between the general student body and the student athletes. The class of 2007 was very close, within four percentage points.   Will you explain how that federal graduation rate is calculated?   Graham stated that it is a six year rate and again, it is only the students who enter the institution in the fall semester as first time freshmen and they have six years to graduate. If they graduate within the six year window they positively affect the graduation rate, but if they transfer for any reason or are suspended, any reason that they leave the institution, they will forever penalize you as far as your graduation rate.   Do you track graduation rate by major and by sport?   Graham stated that they do track it by sport, but not by major.   What are the best performing sports?   The response was women’s sports.   Have you looked at the correlation of student athletes missing classes and the level of performance?   Graham stated that when sports are in season that becomes a challenge for some sports more than others. She said one thing that they have talked about is the use of nontraditional classes, online classes in a season when they are going to miss a significant amount of classes, but that presents its own challenges as well, so it is something that every semester they are working on in trying to help the student athletes.   2005-2008 Student-Athlete Graduation Rate (Slide)   Graham explained the four years that would go into what is reported as a four class average. She said nationally we get the report of the single year federal graduation rate, but we also get a four class average which is 67% for NC State’s student athletes. We graduated over the four years a raw number of 219 student athletes.   Is the 22% that transferred higher than you see in most student body populations?   Graham responded yes, it is an approximate number, about 10% higher than the general student body and that is part of the gap. Student athletes is a group that transfer at a much higher rate than a general student body for various reasons. That is the number that stands out in our four class average of graduation rates, the students who were tracking toward graduation but then left our institution in good standing.   You have transfer and withdrawal under the same bucket; is there a division of that?   Graham stated that they have the breakdown by class for that information. Most of the students do transfer and almost immediately enroll in another institution. The numbers were very small for students who withdraw and then not known to transfer, to the tune of about 2 or 3 per cohort.   Graduation Success Rate   Graham stated that the graduation success rate is a metric that has been created by the NCAA, so this cohort is different than the federal cohort. This group starts with the federal cohort and then adds to it any students that join our institution mid-year and any students who transfer to our institution from another institution. Then it removes any students that leave your institution in good standing and that is really to try to account for students who pursue professional careers and for students who transfer, so it gives you the data that shows if your student athlete stays at your institution, do they persist to graduate.   Graham stated that the graduation success rate is always reported as a four year average. The 2005-2008 is our highest graduation rate that we have had to date, which is exciting for us because it shows that the students who stay and participate in their team are graduating at a rate of 83%, that is equal to the rate for the NCAA Division I national average as well.   Graduation Success   Graham reported that for NC State on the men’s side, four of the nine teams reported on the slide are at or above the Division I national average for their sport. As pointed out earlier the women are performing at a higher level in comparison to their average for their sport and 6 of the 9 teams are at or above the Division I average for their sport.   Overall with this metric NC State students are trending very well nationally.   Are there any measures that assist them with taking responsibility for their progress toward graduation?   Graham responded yes. This has been something that the academic support program has worked on over the last five years or so and it starts with when students apply out of high school. We have developed a survey that student athletes can fill out and they have to select all the courses that they are going to take and why they want to take those courses, prior to arriving on campus. We have transitioned them into freshman year where they all take the USC 103 class, which is the introduction to the university course, and in that course we have changed the curriculum to really focus on degree audits, registration procedures, why are they taking prerequisites as they progress toward declaring their major, or in their major how does everything count toward graduation.   Title IX Participation Ratio Variances   Dr. Sawyers stated that NC State’s 2013-14 variance was 3.16%, which is the difference between the proportion of women in the student body and the proportion of women student athletes, so in 2013-14 44.29% of our student body were women and 41. 13% of our student athletes were women. We track on scholarships that are received by the women and men student athletes. For example, in 2013-14 women athletes received 41.96% of the scholarship expenditure during that year and they account for just over 41% of the student athletes, more than their fair share of the scholarship expenditures. We also look at the qualitative factors, the facilities that the men and the women have as well. New data for 2014-15 has just come out and will be provided at a later date.   Dr. Sawyers stated that the final information he would like to provide is that one of 65 new NCAA proposals out there that we are going to have to vote on as an institution is academic misconduct. It has been about 30 years since NCAA updated their academic misconduct rules, to the point that if you saw Chapel Hill’s problems it was difficult for the NCAA to figure out when you had academic misconduct whether it was an NCAA issue or whether it was something that should be under institutional authority. So, one of the things that the new proposal does is it expands the rule to cover situations in which an institutional staff member is involved somehow in the academic misconduct. That institutional staff member is defined as virtually anyone other than a student employee who works for the institution or the athletic department regardless of whether they receive compensation.   Comments from Debbie Yow, Athletics Director   Dr. Yow stated that the legislation that is coming up does not go far enough. It would be the student workers who would be most likely to be involved in some type of an issue. Student trainers, student strengthening and conditioning coaches, undergraduates working day to day with a student athlete population and becoming friends, that is where this would most likely happen.   Dr. Sawyer stated that there is an exception to the exception; it does pick up some student employees. A student employee is an institutional staff member if he or she has institutional responsibilities to provide academic services to student athletes or the general student body or he or she engages in academic misconduct or provides impermissible academic assistance at the direction of a non-student employee, institutional staff member, or representative of athletics interest.   Dr. Yow stated that Katie Graham has a terrific system with the tutors. As an example there can be no communication between a student athlete and a tutor outside of their tutoring session. She does a tremendous job of trying to best insure that these things are followed and that we have protocol. A number of the changes that were made at Chapel Hill recently in fact, they are a number of things that we were doing ten years ago that they are now implementing for the first time. That all bodes well for us, but there are no guarantees.   Dr. Yow handed out a sheet entitled “How to Operationalize Your Philosophy and Values into a Culture of Integrity and Excellence” that she wrote a while back as a result of having conversations with coaches. She stated that she has monthly meetings with the coaches and there is always something on academics and always something to be shared on compliance. This was developed to begin talking with the coaches about why it matters to develop a culture, how you really do operationalize it. She explained the chart on the reverse side of the handout. She stated that they do think through these things in terms of ERA (Establish the culture, Reinforce the culture, and Act with integrity when the culture is threatened).   Dr. Yow stated that we could have an issue here. The key is not whether or not you ever have one. She said there are 20,000 boosters in the Wolfpack Club and none of us here is going to determine how an individual acts, but if there were something that happened we should deal with it directly and honestly. We should be most concerned if it was systemic in nature. Do we have the right system in place to protect us for many systemic issues? And as we watch our sister institution and what they have gone through in athletics it appears that some of this was systemic. We never want to have anything like that. My focus is not on that. My focus is on: are we hiring the right coaches, because they are the leaders and they are on the front line and they see the students every day. She noted that she doesn’t; she is busy trying to find money for them to run their programs.   Dr. Yow stated that we do have the exchange of tangible assets for the undergraduate student fee, which is 9.5% of our budget, other than that we have to find the rest because we are not going to receive any state funding and nor should we, we don’t want to be a drain on the campus.   Questions and Comments   How many students are on scholarship?   Dr. Yow stated that of the 550 total approximately 350 are on scholarships. We have a large number of walk-ons and none of them are captured in these graduation numbers. We provide the NCAA limit for every sport that we sponsor and we have 23 varsity sports.   How do you feel about the pressure that you and your staff are going to face outside the University for performance and winning?   Dr. Yow stated that she doesn’t feel the pressure. She has been what she does for almost 40 years. She said she does feel pressure, but she has been in this enterprise so long. “I’m at the tail end of my career and I’m not planning on sacrificing my own personal integrity for any expedient reason that might exist. I can assure you that upon my retirement the Chancellor will go out and find another one that thinks the same way, so don’t worry about that part, worry about the lone wolf of athletics. One thing I think we need to be careful of is being balanced in how we approach these things. We are okay, as a group as a community, and as a university.”   If a student athlete, such as a basketball player, is in need of personal items such as coat, shoes, etc., how do we bring that to the attention of the NCAA?   Dr. Yow stated that they give students their scholarships, which all basketball players are on full scholarship because they are a headcount sport. They receive something called student opportunity money. They now get the cost of attendance gap. We give diapers, baby carriages, shoes, coats, suits, and we pay for trips home. She stated that in the last five years since she has been here the students have been well taken care of. They don’t know if the student doesn’t speak up, so if you would just send an email we will take care of it.  

 7. Issues of Concern

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences Undergraduate Education Committee expressed concern over faculty time involved in entering course data in the new online Course Inventory Management (CIM) system. The Faculty Senate Executive Committee discussed this and concluded that the main   aspects of the concern are already being discussed in committee. It was also noted that course data entry is a one-time event to populate the system.   Chair Moore stated that the Executive Committee received some new information and will review this issue again at the meeting on Thursday.  

 8. Adjourn

The meeting adjourned at 4:22 p.m.
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